Responsible Feeding of Stray Animals

Did you start off by feeding one or two stray cats, and now there’s a handful or a dozen cats at your doorstep, waiting for food? Learn how to be a responsible feeder.

Responsible Feeding of Stray Animals

Did you start off by feeding one or two stray cats, and now there’s a handful or a dozen cats at your doorstep, waiting for food? Learn how to be a responsible feeder.

Managed Feeding

When feeding stray animals, especially cats, they tend to multiply very quickly especially when there is food source (holding capacity) and they are not spayed/neutered (kapon). A responsible feeder will ensure that the population is kept under control so that the animals do not become a nuisance to the community.

Does feeding strays really help?

Because we love animals, we don’t want to see them going hungry. However, irresponsible feeding have some serious consequences, and may end up harming the animals even more.

A Responsible Feeder must do the following:

1. Feed only the right amount – An excess in food supply will attract stray animals from neighboring communities.

2. Feed out of sight, away from high traffic areas – This way, they also remain out of sight and away from vehicles and people who do not like the presence of stray animals.

3. Do not tame stray animals – Stray animals that are tamed will depend too much on humans and lose their survival instincts. It also makes them an easy target to people who would harm animals.

4. Have them spayed/neutered (kapon) – Well-fed, healthy animals tend to reproduce more. Please have them neutered, or inquire about a TNR for your area.

You become the owner of a “stray” animal if:

1. It has come to depend on you for food and shelter.

When an animal loses its hunting instincts, it becomes vulnerable. It will starve if you stop feeding it for any reason, like if you move to a different location or get sick.

2) You let the animal into our home or it stays in your property.

If this is already the case, why not give the animal a permanent home? By doing this, you can ensure his/her safety and avoid issues with neighbors and animal control units.

3. You have given it a name, and it responds when you call.

This shows that a bond has been established between you and the “stray” animal. This, too, leaves them vulnerable, especially if it has become too trusting of humans.

Organize a TNR for your community

1) Ask your community leaders (Barangay Captain, HOA President, building admin) to coordinate with a licensed vet that can offer low-cost (charity) rates for spay and neuter.
OR
2) Ask your community leaders to coordinate with PAWS. Our TNR program includes a free seminar on animal control, humane trapping, managed feeding and animal welfare laws.

NOTE: City pounds often perform “Trap & Kill.”
This is NOT a permanent solution to the overpopulation of cats.

How you can help

The shelter and all our programs and campaigns are funded solely by donations. You can donate any amount via bank deposit or Paypal transfer.

Bank of the Philippine Islands (Swift no. BOPIPHMM)
Acct Name: The Philippine Animal Welfare Society, Inc.
USD Acct No. 3944-0021-61
PHP Acct No. 3943-0086-11

Philippine National Bank (Swift no. PNBM PHMM)
Acct Name: The Philippine Animal Welfare Society, Inc.
Acct No. 1888-70015305

BDO Savings
Acct Name : The Philippine Animal Welfare Society, Inc.
Acct No : 0036-4007-0350

Checks should be issued to Philippine Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)

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Paypal is the easiest and safest way to donate online using your credit card.
You do not need to be a PayPal member.

PAWS Animal Rehabilitation Center (PARC)

Aurora Blvd. Katipunan Valley,
Loyola Heights, Quezon City,
Philippines 1108
***WE ARE TEMPORARILY CLOSED, AND WE DO NOT HAVE BRANCHES ANYWHERE ELSE.***

Tel. (02) 7577-7178 (temporary ECQ#)

Please note that this number is used mainly for scheduling spay/neuter appointments, and is often busy. Please call only if absolutely necessary, and only if your concern is not addressed in our FAQs. It is best to message us [HERE]

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